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  • June 25, 2015 10:38 AM | Anonymous

    I had the pleasure of sitting on a panel at the National Academy West for the Cleantech Open (http://www2.cleantechopen.org/) this last weekend with Ron Flavin, Larry Kelly and Ian Gardner where we debated the biggest mistakes that entrepreneurs make when raising capital.  A great event! I will set forth in this third in a series of 10 posts some of the mistakes that were presented and discussed.

    #3 (not necessarily in order of importance) Not Knowing the Investor

    If an individual, business or fund invests in you, the relationship will be one of the most significant relationships of your business and possibly of your life.  Taking money from an investor without knowing them is less like a blind date and more like an arranged marriage.  You can only hope that it will work out.

    However, the likelihood of receiving funding from an investor that you do not know is very poor.  There is a common saying that investors do not invest in people that they do not know.  The single most important factor in the success of a business is the management team.  An investor will want to get to know you and that takes time.  However, it takes no time at all to say no.

    Yes, you may see someone receive money on a TV show, but that is entertainment and not reality.  Even then, the business has been vetted and a contract signed after hundreds of businesses have been reviewed and rejected before they are presented to the celebrities for consideration.

    Even if an investor is ready to write a check, you may want to refuse it.  There may be all kinds of reasons why you cannot afford to take their money.  They may want to control your business, control you, steal your business, steal from your business or engage your business in illegal business.  [See Snakes in Suits: When Psychopaths Go to Work by Paul Babiak and Robert D. Hare].

    You may find that the investor requires a lot of hand holding, distracting you from your business while you educate them, reassure them, cater to them or simply waste time with them.  You may find that your personalities clash and that they do not make a good team member.  There may be lots of reasons to look for better money.

    You need to know how the investor will act if things go wrong.  Will they walk away from their money or double down their investment?  Will they point the finger at you, dump you for a new management team or turn loose their attorneys?  Almost everyone can get along when things are fine, but teamwork is hard when things go wrong.

    Knowing an investor is one form of due diligence.  You should check out their LinkedIn profile, talk to other businesses in which they have invested and consider the level of their community engagement and support.  Ask for referrals and endorsements just like any new hire.  All of this investigation should be completed before setting a meeting.  You should not be conducting an interview while doing your pitch.

    Not knowing the investor and other common mistakes in raising capital will be addressed at the upcoming workshop on Building Capital that will be presented by the Colorado Capital Congress on July 9th in collaboration with TIE Rockies (http://rockies.tie.org/), the Rocky Mountain chapter of TIE, one of the world’s largest entrepreneur organizations.  For more information on this workshop, go to: http://www.coloradocapitalcongress.com/event-1922132


  • June 23, 2015 6:27 AM | Anonymous

    I had the pleasure of sitting on a panel at the National Academy West for the Cleantech Open (http://www2.cleantechopen.org/) this last weekend with Ron Flavin, Larry Kelly and Ian Gardner where we debated the biggest mistakes that entrepreneurs make when raising capital.  A great event! I will set forth in this second of a series of 10 posts some of the mistakes that were presented and discussed.

    #2 (not necessarily in order of importance) Pitching Too Early

    Entrepreneurs are always in a hurry and particularly with regard to raising capital.  I don’t know when I last asked an entrepreneur when they needed capital with getting the answer “Yesterday!”  I am the same way with my own projects, so I am not pointing fingers.

    However, your sense of urgency is not shared by the investor.  In fact, I know a number of wealthy individuals who seem to exist in a different world where time has been devalued to the point that it doesn’t really matter. 

    The problem is that if you tell your story before it is ready, you will get turned down.  You probably will not get another chance to pitch.  You will have wasted all the time that you have invested in building a relationship with the investor (if you have not invested any time, you are too early).  You will have wasted your time – a priceless asset.

    When I am raising capital, it is more common for me to put off a pitch by telling the investor that I am not yet ready.  I always welcome a conversation with investor candidates so I can seek to determine their investment criteria.  But I avoid placing them in a position where they have to make an investment decision until I am fairly certain of getting a yes. [Note: If I am fairly sure of getting a no, I won’t ask for anything other than a referral.  I intend to come back to this same individual or business at a later time on my next project and I don’t want to train them to say no or to avoid me because it creates tension in our relationship.]

    So when is too early?

    Naturally, the answer varies with the investor candidate.  Some investors love the unknown and will jump on a deal when it is still in the concept phase.  Other investors will wait for a prototype, a market study or even first sale while others will want a five year track record.

    It is too early when you can’t answer all of the investor candidate’s questions.  If you can be stumped with a question about your product, the market, your business operations, your team or anything else that you should know, you are too early.  You need to find out the answers to all of these questions for your own use.  Not knowing them may be viewed as being careless with your operations or the money of the investor.  In any case, you lose credibility and the investor looks elsewhere.

    It is too early when you have to give up all or nearly all of the ownership of your business in order to obtain the investment.  This means that you are asking the investor to take all of the risk and that you are asking to work for the investors instead of yourself.  Every time you knock down a major milestone, the risk of your business goes down and so should the cost of money.

    It is too early when you haven’t finished your pivots.  If you are still making significant changes in your strategy as you engage 100 customer candidates in conversation, you should wait until your opportunity will stand still.  If you ask for money for one business and then use that money in another, you not only confuse your investor, but you may be viewed as a fraud.

    It is too early if the ink is still wet on your business cards.  Some entrepreneurs consider raising capital as the first item of business.  All they have is an idea.  Unproven.  Unimproved.  No value added.  No investment made by the entrepreneur.  Ideas are a commodity.

    It is too early if you are the only one answering the questions of the investor.  This means you have no team.  If you are unable to continue for any reason, the investor is left with a complete loss.  In addition, this means you must do it all – a capability few people possess.  It suggests that no one else believes in you.  The investor questions why you are all alone.  If you cannot inspire a team, how can you sell customers?

    Pitching too early and other common mistakes in raising capital will be addressed at the upcoming workshop on Building Capital that will be presented by the Colorado Capital Congress on July 9th in collaboration with TIE Rockies (http://rockies.tie.org/), the Rocky Mountain chapter of TIE, one of the world’s largest entrepreneur organizations.  For more information on this workshop, go to: http://www.coloradocapitalcongress.com/event-1922132


  • June 22, 2015 9:39 AM | Anonymous

    I had the pleasure of sitting on a panel at the National Academy West for the Cleantech Open (http://www2.cleantechopen.org/) this last weekend with Ron Flavin, Larry Kelly and Ian Gardner where we debated the biggest mistakes that entrepreneurs make when raising capital.  A great event! I will set forth in this first of a series of 10 posts some of the mistakes that were presented and discussed.

    #1 (not in order of importance) Pitching to the Wrong People

    Entrepreneurs seeking capital are turned down almost all the time.  Statistics on bank loans show 95%+ of the applications get turned down and statistics on angel submissions show that 98%+ of the submissions get turned down.

    Why?

    Entrepreneurs often fail to recognize that all investors are different.  Each investor has their own criteria and reasons for how and why they invest.  In addition, each investor has their own experiences in investing which will influence their selection of possible investments.  Bottom line – each investor is unique.

    To look at this from a different perspective, treat each investor like a customer candidate.  However, instead of selling them your product or service, you are selling them part of your business.

    In the same way that you cannot reasonably expect everyone to be a customer for your products or services, you cannot expect everyone to be an investor in your business.

    In the same way that you have some customer candidates for your products or services who are more likely to purchase than others, you have investor candidates who are more likely to invest than others.

    In the same way that your customer candidates will consider purchasing the products or services of your competitors, your investor candidates will consider investing in other businesses.

    The lean startup approach advocated by Steve Blank (http://steveblank.com/)calls for meeting with 100+ customer candidates to learn if what you have to sell is wanted and by whom.  Even where a new product or service is desired, there are those customers who are early adopters and those who are last to purchase.  This same approach is true for investors.

    If you pitch an alternative energy business to an investor who only invests in food production, you will get rejected.

    If you pitch a start up with no revenue to a bank that requires five years of operating history, you will get rejected.

    If you pitch for $5 million dollars to an investor with only $100,000, you will get rejected.

    If you pitch for money and the investor doesn’t have any at the time you ask, you will get rejected.

    If you pitch the sale of stock in your company that requires that you get acquired (build and flip) to reach a cash exit and the investor prefers an exit in the form of a royalty, you will get rejected.

    The list is almost endless.  There are as many reasons for getting rejected as there are investors.  Back to my point: all investors are different.

    In order to reduce the number of rejections and to accelerate completion of your capital raise, you need to pitch to those investors who are most likely to invest the type and amount of capital within a type of capital transaction that fits you. 

    Don’t assume that everyone with money will invest in your business.  Ask.  Survey.  Get recommendations.  Study. 

    Ask for a debrief when you get rejected.  Each time you get rejected, you should pivot and get more precise in your search.

    You need to engage in investor profiling.  Who will benefit most from investing in your business? What would your optimum investor look like?  What criteria will they have for making an investment?  Who else will use all or part of these criteria?  Start with those who are most likely to invest.  Know who they are and why they love you or what you are doing.  Find those investors who need you to meet their own goals.

    It is possible you are pitching to the right investor candidate and that you are getting rejected for other reasons.  Those are some of the other common mistakes entrepreneurs make.

    Talking to the wrong investors and other common mistakes in raising capital will be addressed at the upcoming workshop on Building Capital that will be presented by the Colorado Capital Congress on July 9th in collaboration with TIE Rockies (http://rockies.tie.org/), the Rocky Mountain chapter of TIE, one of the world’s largest entrepreneur organizations.  For more information on this workshop, go to: http://www.coloradocapitalcongress.com/event-1922132


  • May 26, 2015 7:25 AM | Anonymous

    Time and time again entrepreneurs and small business owners get turned down when raising money.  The statistics show that over 95% of bank loan applications and angel investor submissions get rejected.  The tendency is to blame the bank or the angel investor for being bureaucratic or greedy instead of asking the question “Did the business meet the criteria of the capital source?”

    This high failure raise leads to statements that there is “no money out there” when in fact “there is capital everywhere”.  How can there be this radical difference in perspective?

    Maybe people are looking for money in all the wrong places?  This analysis sounds like the lyrics to Johnny Lees’ song Looking for Love

    When talking about love, you often hear people talking about their ‘soul mate’ – that one person on this planet who fate has dictated will be the source of happiness in a relationship.  This analysis recognizes that everyone is different – we are all humans, but we are individuals.  It supports the thinking that there is that one person who is the best match for any other person.  This rationale is the framework for dating and matchmaking services.

    However, when it comes to money, all of this analysis is abandoned.  The focus becomes on the money, not on who is making the decision to invest the money.  Yet, the individual making an investment decision is just as unique as the individual falling in love.

    So, in the hunt for funding, who would be the ‘money mate’ for your business?  Who is the perfect match that will make all your dreams come true?  Time expended in this analysis will shorten the time expended in seeking funding.

    Institutional investors (banks and venture capitalists and finance companies) are engaged in a business where they have to make money on their money.  They have established criteria that they follow when making investment decisions and they will share that with you.  If you don’t meet the criteria, don’t be surprised if you get turned down when you apply.

    Wealthy individuals may or may not have set their criteria for investing.  Ask these individuals for their criteria.  In some cases, it is limited to making money.  In other cases, it is to advance a cause and create a positive impact on their communities.  If you match, then seek funding.  If you don’t match, seek a referral.

    Businesses may invest as matter of strategy.  Does the success of your business advance that strategy?  If so, explore this as a source of funding.

    Customers may now invest through securities crowdfunding.  Their interest in investing is amplified when they care about the products or services that you offer and about your role as a member of your community as a local business.

    Foundations may provide funding through ‘program related investments’ (PRI’s) to those businesses whose mission aligns with their mission.

    Government agencies may provide funding to advance research for the public good or to generate economic growth.

    The interest in investing and the criteria for each investor is different.  Learning this information and using it to find your ‘money mate’ will save a lot of time and heartache.

    The Colorado Capital Congress is presenting a workshop on ‘Building Capital’ on May 28th that will include skill building on matching a business with an optimal investor.  For more information or to register, go to http://www.coloradocapitalcongress.com/events.

    The Colorado Capital Congress is a public benefit corporation whose mission is to help everyone in Colorado gain access to capital.


  • May 11, 2015 8:48 AM | Anonymous

    As I am designing and developing securities crowdfunding campaigns and also working on a catalog of all the types of funds needed for a Capital Community, I have started creating a list of characteristics that may be useful in framing the promotion of a crowdfunding campaign. 

    There are two sets of characteristics: the perspective of the individual or organization conducting a crowdfunding campaign and the perspective of an investor.  As a form of sales and marketing, the conduct of a crowdfunding campaign must look at an investment from both sides of the capital transaction.

    From the perspective of the crowdfunder, the following characteristics maybe important:

    • Type of capital transaction / security (stock, loan, royalty, hybrid, other, etc.)
    • Amount of capital to be raised (5K to 5MM dollars)
    • Ability of investor to provide funding (pocket change or major life decision)
    • The stage of development of the project or organization being funded (Concept to stable growth)
    • The subject or niche market benefiting from the success of the project or organization being funded
    • The duration of the investment (day trade to 20 years)
    • The geographic area in which the investors are residents (5 block radius to international)
    • The primary motivation of the investors (see next list)
    • The cost and time of regulatory compliance
    • The speed with which funding may be completed  (today to 12 months)

    From the perspective of the investor, the following characteristics maybe important:

    • The reason the project or organization is seeking funding (enable operations, to grow, other)
    • The benefit to the investor (without investing) if the project or organization succeeds
    • The additional benefit to the investor from investing (return on investment)
    • The existing relationship (if any) with the individuals or organizations seeking funding
    • The amount of the investment  (time, money from $1 to 5MM dollars)
    • The liquidity of the investment (day trade to indefinite hold)
    • The perception of membership within a defined crowd (do I know other investors)
    • The management team of the project or organization seeking funding

    These lists of perspectives are incomplete (still growing) and are not prioritized in any sense.  In fact, each investor is likely to give more or less importance or no importance at all to items on the list.

    Any message within a crowdfunding campaign must address the perspective of the investor.  As it appears, since there many perspectives, there must me many messages, each tailored so that the investor candidate receiving the message feels that it is addressed to them.

    Too often, entrepreneurs fail to address the perspectives of the investors.  They either assume that all investors are alike or that their deal is so good that all investors will invest.  This is not true for classical investments based upon seeking a return on investment.  And, it will represent a greater error in thinking with regard to crowdfunding.

    The Colorado Capital Congress is providing briefings on crowdfunding to community organizations and presenting fee workshops on Securities Crowdfunding: Colorado Style.  Check the Events calendar for upcoming briefings.  The next workshop will be held on May 21 at Colorado Lending Source.  For more info or to register, go to http://www.coloradocapitalcongress.com/events.


  • May 07, 2015 7:47 PM | Anonymous

    On May 12, 2015, a group of enthusiastic and engaged pre- and post-doctoral trainees, the Science Industry Alliance (SIA), will host the first Rocky Mountain Biotechnology Symposium (RMBTS) at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora.

     Through oral presentations, booths, panel discussions, workshops, one-on-one conversations, and networking throughout the day, participants will learn more about local bioindustry and biotechnology companies. They will also have the chance to set up new connections and collaborations between industry and academia.

    The entire program runs from 7:30 am to 5 pm.

     Karl Dakin, a Director of the Colorado Capital Congress will make a presentation entitled ‘Capital is Everywhere’ at 9:35 am.

    The event will be held at Education 2, South Building, Anschutz Medical Campus of the University of Colorado.

    Registration may be completed at: http://www.ucdenver.edu/faculty_staff/research/postdoctoral/rmbts/Pages/home.aspx


  • May 02, 2015 4:21 PM | Anonymous

    The Colorado Capital Congress is announcing a new program: Leader Training.

    To improve Colorado's capital ecosystem, the Colorado Capital Congress will provide scholarships to community leaders to attend any of its Workshops and learn more about capital.

    Anyone who is a director of a nonprofit organization, an organizer of an entrepreneur, business, innovation or economic development Meetup, or an officer of a civic organization may qualify for this program.

    A limited number of spaces will be available in each Workshop.

    In May, the Colorado Capital Congress will be presenting the following Workshops:

    ·         May 9, Building Capital, DaVinci Institute, Louisville, Colorado

    ·         May 21, Securities Crowdfunding, Colorado Lending Source, Denver, Colorado

    ·         May 28, Building Capital, the GreenHouse, Denver, Colorado

    Anyone who would like a scholarship to a particular Workshop should contact Karl Dakin at karl@coloradocapitalcongress.com.


  • May 01, 2015 8:37 AM | Anonymous

    I sat through a number of entrepreneur pitches recently and was frustrated by the fact that none of the pitches addressed any of the keys to funding:

    • Benefits
    • Value
    • Management

    Without this trifecta, there is no basis for any funding, regardless if the funding is a charitable gift, an impact investment or a classical return on investment (ROI).

    Benefit means that a problem has been solved and as a consequence of this solution that a customer will experience some form of positive change.  If there is no problem to be solved, there can be no benefit.  If there is no solution, there is no benefit.  When a benefit exists, there will be one or more customers.  The potential to solve the problem and benefit a customer is an opportunity.  The opportunity graduates to a product or service when a clear benefit exists.

    Benefit may also be considered a performance or technical test – does it (the product or service) work?

    Benefit is the first key to funding in that it defines the customer, the market and those who care about the customer or who participate in the market.

    Value means that the benefit to the customer exceeds the price charged for the product or service.  Benefit has no value if the customer cannot afford the price charged or the benefit is equal to the price (no positive change).  Once there is a benefit and value, a business opportunity exists.

    Value may also be considered an economic test – can it (the product or service) be sold at a profit?

    Value is the second key to funding in that it indicates possible funding sources:

    • Products and services that cost more than the benefit require charitable giving or government subsidies
    • Products and services that can be sold at cost or for a small profit may qualify for impact investing
    • Products and services that can be sold at high profits may qualify for angel or venture capital investment

    Management means the ability to operate a business resulting in the production of a product or service at a cost below the price and the ability to distribute and sell the product or service.

    Management may also be considered an execution or capability test – can this team perform?

    Management is the third key to funding in that each member of the team has or can develop relationships with different funding sources.  In order to raise capital, a member of management must be able to communicate the benefit and value to a source of capital that matches with that benefit and value.

    The combination of benefit, value and management creates a business.

    Each business is unique.  Raising capital requires matching the three keys of that business with sources of capital (investors, customers, partners, etc.) that care about the specific keys of that business.

    Entrepreneurs seeking to raise capital must have a problem with a solution that is affordable.  In telling their story to obtain capital, they must explain the three keys effectively.

    The Colorado Capital Congress PBC is presenting educational programs on the basics of building capital to assist businesses in Colorado.  The next presentation of the five hour workshop on Building Capital will be held on May 9 at 8 am to 1 pm at the DaVinci Institute, 511 E. South Boulder Road, Louisville, Colorado 80027.  More information about this workshop and registration may be found at: http://www.coloradocapitalcongress.com/Events


  • April 25, 2015 1:45 PM | Anonymous


    Securities Crowdfunding: Colorado Style may become the most popular educational program of the Colorado Capital Congress PBC.  A public benefit corporation, the mission of the Colorado Capital Congress is to improve the capital ecosystem within Colorado.  This goal is being achieved by making both seekers of capital (businesses, nonprofits and community projects) and capital sources (investors, banks, angels and other businesses) smarter in the choices they have in raising and investing capital.

    Securities Crowdfunding: Colorado Style implements the eight step process to raising capital that is taught in the basic course on raising capital – Building Capital – offered by the Colorado Capital Congress. 

    The educational program provides detailed information on the design and implementation of a capital campaign from within the State of Colorado that employs crowdfunding as an approach to raising capital.  It includes a review of existing and new legal crowdfunding laws:

    • Limited Offering (intrastate – Colorado only – available now)
    • Platform (intrastate – Colorado only – available this fall)
    • 506c (multistate – accredited investors only – available now)
    • Reg A+ (multistate- available this summer)

    Critical to the success of a crowdfunding campaign is the development and engagement of a ‘crowd’.  This is most commonly achieved by working with existing customers of the business.  The educational program will include discussion of different ways to leverage a customer base to establish a loyalty program.

    Securities Crowdfunding: Colorado Style is part of a larger educational curriculum on early stage capital – the Seed Capital 2.0 Project (http://www.seedcapital2-0.com).  Additional courses are in planning and development for each participant in the capital industry and for each type of capital raise and form of investment.

    In addition, Securities Crowdfunding: Colorado Style is skills oriented with the desired outcome that the business both obtains the capital it needs and also strengthens its market position:

    1. Knowledge Presentation
    2. Illustration of Knowledge
    3. Exercise in Application of Knowledge
    4. Discussion, Review and Analysis of Knowledge Application
    5. Assessment of Skills Learned




    Completion of the program requires critical thinking.  Immersion in the exercises assures that the participant gains mastery over the topic and is able to realize the value of the program by applying it to their own organization.  The learning cycle is repeated as often as possible within available time.  Typically, one cycle can be completed each hour of a workshop or webinar.

    Securities Crowdfunding: Colorado Style will be of highest value to:

    ·         Entrepreneurs who have or can build a large consumer customer base

    ·         Businesses with growth potential, but not enough potential to meet the high criteria of angel investor groups or venture capitalists

    The educational program is currently offered in a four hour workshop format through Community Partners of the Colorado Capital Congress that now include the DaVinci Institute, Colorado Lending Source, the GreenHouse and TIE Rockies.  http://www.coloradocapitalcongress.com/events

    The next presentation of Securities Crowdfunding: Colorado Style will be April 30 at 8 am at the GreenHouse, 6565 E. Evans, Denver, CO 80224.  http://www.coloradocapitalcongress.com/event-1893910  Although early registration has ended, best prices can still be obtained by joining the Colorado Capital Congress as a member and obtaining the member discount.


  • April 21, 2015 7:37 AM | Anonymous

    Building Capital is currently the flagship educational program of the Colorado Capital Congress PBC: a public benefit corporation.  Its mission is to improve the capital ecosystem within Colorado.  This goal will be achieved by making both businesses and capital sources smarter in the choices they have in raising and investing capital.

     Building Capital presents an eight step process to raising capital that starts with aligning the capital raise with the mission of business and continues through a planning and development process that results in a capital campaign focused on those sources of capital that are most likely to invest.  Individual steps include:

    1. The role of capital in achieving your business goals
    2. Types of capital sources that meet your needs
    3. Types of capital transactions that meet your needs
    4. Planning your capital campaign
    5. Finding a capital source
    6. Building your story
    7. Making your pitch
    8. Closing a capital transaction

     Critical to the design of the educational program is alignment and timing of the capital raising activities of the business with the investing activities of the investor, the support activities of service providers and the community development activities of civic leaders.  Raising capital is a special form of selling a product or service and requires a deep understanding of the marketplace. 

     Building Capital is part of a larger educational curriculum on early stage capital – the Seed Capital 2.0 Project (http://www.seedcapital2-0.com).  Additional courses are in planning and development for each participant in the capital industry and for each type of capital raise and form of investment.




     In addition, Building Capital is skills oriented with the desired outcome that a business may frame out its capital campaign with key decisions made on who would be an optimal investor and how to tell the story of the business to obtain the needed resources:

    1.  Knowledge Presentation
    2. Illustration of Knowledge
    3. Exercise in Application of Knowledge
    4. Discussion, Review and Analysis of Knowledge Application
    5. Assessment of Skills Learned





     Completion of the program requires critical thinking.  Immersion in the exercises assures that the participant gains mastery over the topic and is able to realize the value of the program by applying it to their own organization.  The learning cycle is repeated as often as possible within available time.  Typically, one cycle can be completed each hour of a workshop or webinar.

     Attendees of the workshop have commented, “I recently attended Karl's workshop on Building Capital. For a novice in business like me, it was enlightening. Karl developed a logical sequence of identifying your key capital needs, and then provided a suite of alternatives and how to match them to your specific company goals. All of these terms that were confusing to me are now clear. Karl's seminar is highly recommended.”  Julio Zimbron, Assistant Research Professor, Colorado State University

     I just attended Karl's Business Capital workshop and it was worth every penny! I took away ideas that I'm already putting to use. I'm glad I took the workshop before I started my latest business adventure. Karl's ideas are going to make this startup easier, faster, and financially solid. Thank you Karl!”  Steve Elliott, Consultant, Lean Processing

    Building Capital will be of highest value to:

    • Entrepreneurs who have never raised capital before
    • Entrepreneurs who are exploring new ways to raise capital
    • Entrepreneurs who are currently raising capital and want to speed up their campaigns

    The educational program is currently offered in a four hour workshop format through Community Partners of the Colorado Capital Congress that now include the DaVinci Institute, Colorado Lending Source, the GreenHouse and TIE Rockies.  http://www.coloradocapitalcongress.com/events

    The next presentation of Building Capital will be April 23 at 8 am at Colorado Lending Source, 1441 18th Street, Denver, CO 80202.  http://www.coloradocapitalcongress.com/event-1878717

    Although early registration has ended, best prices can still be obtained by joining the Colorado Capital Congress as a member and obtaining the member discount.


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